Trail – Scottish Ultramarathon Series http://scottishultramarathonseries.org/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 04:12:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://scottishultramarathonseries.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/cropped-icon-32x32.png Trail – Scottish Ultramarathon Series http://scottishultramarathonseries.org/ 32 32 Eight is good: Sorsby’s eight touchdowns propel Lake Dallas past the Lebanon Trail | Sports https://scottishultramarathonseries.org/eight-is-good-sorsbys-eight-touchdowns-propel-lake-dallas-past-the-lebanon-trail-sports/ https://scottishultramarathonseries.org/eight-is-good-sorsbys-eight-touchdowns-propel-lake-dallas-past-the-lebanon-trail-sports/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 04:12:00 +0000 https://scottishultramarathonseries.org/eight-is-good-sorsbys-eight-touchdowns-propel-lake-dallas-past-the-lebanon-trail-sports/

CORINTH – Two games, two turnovers and the Lake Dallas soccer team had a 14-0 lead before Lebanon Trail could blink.

It was the descent from there for the Blazers, as the Falcons picked up a 56-32 victory Friday at Falcon Field in the two teams’ second game of the year in District 7-5A Division II.

“Our defense hasn’t had a lot of turnovers this year so it was good to grab a few right away and start the game on the right foot,” said Jason Young, Lake Dallas head coach. . “When we play like that, and we take the mistakes out and just run, I really believe we can play with anybody.”

Lake Dallas senior quarterback Brendan Sorsby had seven first-half touchdowns, including four rushing runs. He finished the game with 153 rushing yards and five total touchdowns, including a 92-yard first-half touchdown.

Running back Drew McKinney paced Lake Dallas with 152 yards on 13 carries. Lake Dallas second-year wide receiver Keonde Henry looked good in place of star Evan Wineberg, who left the game early with injury. Receiver Niki Gray also added a score with 101 receiving yards.

It was a necessary victory for the Falcons after a 70-27 victory at the hands of Frisco in the first week of the district game. The Lebanon Trail, on the other hand, drops to 0-2 in the district game.

“We just needed to move forward from last week,” Young said.

Lebanon Trail quarterback Gregory Hatley, a converted running back, dazzled with his legs, finishing with four rushing touchdowns. But the Blazers’ huge deficit forced head coach Sadd Jackson out of the race in the second half.

“I want our kids to get used to success,” Jackson said. “Right now, when something bad happens, it snowballs us. Tonight we’ve let a few negative plays happen, and before you know it we’ve dropped 25 points.

The Lebanon Trail running game – and the overall offense – also suffered from the loss of senior running back Parker Mawhee, who was injured in the first quarter and did not return.

The Blazers were chasing points early in the game while the outcome was still uncertain. Kicker Luke Adkins missed the extra point after the first touchdown of the Lebanon Trail game, and the Blazers failed to convert in two two-point conversion attempts after the team’s two touchdowns that followed. . At one point, Lake Dallas was leading 28-18 – a score that would have been 28-21 had three more runs been drawn and made.

The missed extra point, of course, follows a disastrous start to the match for Lebanon Trail.

Hatley fired a double-cover pass in the game’s opening play, and the ball was picked up by Lake Dallas junior Xinjin Gomez. The Falcons quickly scored the turnover for a 7-0 lead.

“[Hatley] did some good things tonight, but we have a lot of work to do, ”said Jackson.

In the second game of the Lebanon Trail game, running back Grant Lambert missed the ball and Lake Dallas recovered. The next game, Soresby hit Weinberg for a touchdown.

The Liban Trail came close to 14-6 and 28-18 in the first half, but never came close all night.

Alternate quarterback Micaiah Brooks, who also plays receiver, took pictures in the fourth quarter for Lake Dallas. Liban Trail also put in a backup at several key positions once the final quarter began, including wide receiver turned quarterback Connor Belew.

For the Blazers, Hatley finished with 187 passing yards and 128 rushing yards. Kaleb Broadway ran 66 yards on 10 carries. Timothy Madison caught five passes for 113 yards and Belew added seven assists. Hayden Lamb caught Hatley’s only touchdown pass.

Lake Dallas will face Frisco Memorial next week at the Star in Frisco. The Lebanon Trail welcomes Frisco to the Toyota Stadium.

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Grand County Trails: National Public Lands Day needs your help https://scottishultramarathonseries.org/grand-county-trails-national-public-lands-day-needs-your-help/ https://scottishultramarathonseries.org/grand-county-trails-national-public-lands-day-needs-your-help/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 19:04:00 +0000 https://scottishultramarathonseries.org/grand-county-trails-national-public-lands-day-needs-your-help/

When planning for National Public Lands Day, agencies try to make sure they have projects for all skill and interest levels.
Diana Lynn Rau / courtesy photo

“There is strength in unity… when there is teamwork and collaboration, wonderful things can be achieved. “

This quote from Mattie Stephanek was used in 2015 by the Headwaters Trails Alliance to describe how National Public Lands Day works.

This annual event where hundreds of people come together, work hard, have fun and accomplish so much for public lands embodies the meaning of his words. This is your chance to give back to the trails you love by coming together and working hard, whether it’s in the field maneuvering a shovel or helping out at the picnic in Polhamus Park. The event allows attendees to have fun with like-minded people, compare stories and solve global problems, all while achieving more together in one day than the US Forest Service could accomplish in three years.



Join us on September 25 at one of the individual project sites described below. There are some COVID precautions in place, such as encouraging social distancing, masking where appropriate, and other “common sense” precautions we are all used to by now.

The colors must be fantastic. We hope for a beautiful fall day in the wilderness but, as always, be prepared for anything.



The mission of National Public Lands Day is to promote the awareness of volunteers in:

• protect and maintain public lands through an annual trail education event;

• maintenance and construction, thereby strengthening advocacy and ownership of our public lands, and strengthening cooperation and communication between public agencies, communities and businesses. This is Grand County’s 27th annual event, the oldest in the country.

The Grand County NPLD is a huge success because of its dedicated volunteers as well as the many businesses and government entities involved and the variety of projects on offer.

Volunteers come from as far away as Boston and many return year after year. Each project is aimed at certain types of outdoor enthusiasts such as motor vehicle users, mountain bikers, rafters, fishermen, hikers and horse riders.

Projects for this year include:

Headwaters Colorado River Cleanup (BLM) – Join the BLM at the 12th Annual River Cleanup, clearing trash and debris along a 30 mile stretch of the Colorado River in three sections, starting at the Pumphouse Recreation Area to Two Rivers. All works are accessible by floating the river.

Space is available for around 50 volunteers who do not have their own boats with pre-registration strongly recommended. If you are providing your own boat, pre-registration is not necessary. Volunteers can meet at the Pumphouse Recreation Area. It is a family project.

Participants are encouraged to bring their own boats, PFDs and / or paddles. For more information or to pre-register, contact John Monkouski at 970-724-3040. Proficiency rating: is to moderate.

• Strawberry / Phases Trail System (BLM / HTA): Several projects are available on this site according to skills and physicality. Projects will include the re-routing of phase .25 to a more sustainable slope and the use of trail construction tools; installing cables around a new parking lot; and the installation of a new kiosk and new signage in the parking lots. Additional work to be done includes trail brushing, slope / slope drainage, pruning and clearing. Competency assessment: easy to difficult.

• Lower Creekside Trail (USFS / HTA): The project will construct toll highways on the Lower Creekside Trail in Fraser. The work may consist of hammering, shoveling, brushing, limbing, brushing, digging, grinding. Proficiency rating: easy to moderate.

• Turkey Spur / Tonahutu Trail (RMNP – NPS): Fire recovery in the national park on the Turkey Spur / Tonahutu trails. The work will include work on the tread and construction of a log causeway in an area affected by the eastern fire. An additional project may include the construction of a buck & rail fence. Skill level: moderate to difficult.

• Training of stewardship ambassadors and work on the CPW trail: This day begins at the HTA office in Fraser for a stewardship ambassador program training and will end in the field working on the downgrading of a social trail on a wildlife conservation easement in Granby. Skills required include minor work on track tools. Skill level: easy.

Due to Covid precautions, this year’s event is again smaller than in the past. Each project is capped between seven and 15 participants, with the exception of the BLM River Cleanup, which can take many more volunteers depending on the availability of boats. Everyone must register to participate at http://bit.ly/npldgc2021.

It takes a lot of help to make an operation like this successful. You do not need to be an athlete to participate in the NPLD. There are fewer physical jobs in the field – just ask – or choose to participate in the highly successful stewardship training.

All volunteers should be ready to work, with appropriate clothing: long pants, long sleeves, boots, hat, sunglasses, gloves. They should also be prepared for any type of weather; as we know here, the weather in the mountains is a finicky beast.

At 4:30 p.m., there will be Picnic on Public Lands in the Park, a family community gathering at Polhamus Park in Granby, to celebrate our public lands and the organizations and volunteers that make them safe and enjoyable for everyone. The event will run until 8:30 p.m., so pack a basket and come relax with your neighbors in a comfortable outdoor setting.

Two local bands will perform: River Wilder and The Moffat Tunnel Band. Drinks will be provided by Alcools R&J de Granby. Various nonprofits and others will have tables to educate and engage. There will also be a raffle for sporting goods and other items from local and Colorado businesses.

For more information contact Sean Burke, Field Program Manager at Headwaters Trails Alliance, at 970-726-1013 or sean@headwaterstrails.org, or contact Jeremy Krones, Executive Director of Colorado Headwaters Land Trust, at 970-887-1177 or jeremy@coloradoheadwaterslandtrust.org.

Additionally, GC-NPLD Steering Committee members will participate in a public conversation on Zoom at 5:30 p.m. on September 23 to talk about the 2021 event and what public lands mean to us. This informative conference will be hosted by CHLT: https://bit.ly/chltzoom0923.

A volunteer cleans up debris from the East Shore Trail during Public Lands Day 2019 in Grand County. The work on the trail helped prepare him for the use of the bike.
Amy Golden / Sky-Hi News.

Volunteers can work on a variety of projects each year for Public Lands Day, like this work on the East Shore Trail in 2019.
Amy Golden / Sky-Hi News

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Trail Builders Lead the Way for Exciting Nature Hikes | https://scottishultramarathonseries.org/trail-builders-lead-the-way-for-exciting-nature-hikes/ https://scottishultramarathonseries.org/trail-builders-lead-the-way-for-exciting-nature-hikes/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 05:33:00 +0000 https://scottishultramarathonseries.org/trail-builders-lead-the-way-for-exciting-nature-hikes/

You don’t see them when you walk through the leaves on your hike. You won’t see them as you weave your way through an inviting crevice between two boulders to discover what lies beyond. Don’t look for them when pedaling towards a perfectly placed berm or you could fall off your bike. Just know that the people responsible for the thrilling run and the inviting passage, the people who are planning where you will walk and what you will see – they see you. These trail workers are the invisible architects who guide your interaction with the great outdoors.

In North America, trail designers and maintainers come from public and private groups, government agencies and community programs, and sometimes they are simply private owners. Together, their work over the past century has resulted in nearly 200,000 miles of trails on federal lands alone as of 2015. That’s four times the mileage of the US interstate highway system.

“They’re weavers when they weave a trail around that rock and that tree and over that hill,” said Erik Mickelson, an independent trail consultant who hosts Trailism, an information website for trail users. “They are sculptors when they carve a long, elongated, curvy bench out of dirt, masons or exterior designers in the way they move or shape the stones.”

Parc national du Mont-Mégantic in Quebec is known for its all-season trails and spectacular views of the 3,000-foot peaks of Mégantic and Saint-Joseph.

When infrastructure and conservation manager Camille-Antoine Ouimet set out to design the park’s newest Escarpements trail a few years ago, he wanted to focus not on the grandiose, but on the wide variety of mountain microenvironments. The multi-level path carved into the rock encourages hikers to linger at every turn. It was at a time when the trail got me stuck between two rocks that I started to wonder: who designed this?

“The main feature,” Ouimet told me, “was all these little cliffs and rocks and the diverse terrain that creates a feeling of being on a big mountain but also with an intimacy with this forest and this assemblage of rocks.”

“The diversity of the place was a blessing for the experience, but it was a big challenge,” said Ouimet. Upon discovering a protected fern species, for example, Ouimet had to alter the path of the trail to ensure that hikers did not affect the plants.

An important part of working on the trails is satisfying our love of nature while making sure not to suffocate it with misguided affection. So if the hard work Alexa Sharp puts into her job as the leader of an all-female maintenance crew in the Southeast Conservation Corps working in Kentucky’s Daniel Boone National Forest goes unnoticed, Sharp, 27, is dying. ‘okay with that.

“People go to these places to be in as natural a space as possible, to find peace in the natural world,” said Sharp. “It’s not about us as trail workers leaving our mark or anything like that. It’s about respecting the place and leaving it as we found it, but just a little more maintained and taken care of.

Trail use has tripled in the United States since the coronavirus pandemic struck in early 2020, according to data from AllTrails, a provider of participatory information on trails of all kinds. Even before that, tens of millions of Americans were benefiting from a trail system started in 1965, when President Lyndon B. Johnson told Congress that hikers, horse riders and cyclists were “forgotten men of the outdoors.” “. “For them,” he said, “we have to have trails as well as highways. “

Yet all of these explorers can’t help but affect the environment – and not always in a good way.

“There’s a double-edged sword when you create a trail,” said Kathryn Kolb, executive director of the Atlanta-based environmental group EcoAddendum, whose mission is to teach good stewardship of wild places.

“Green space is positive, wonderful for public access. The problem can be if this public access is done in a way that harms the exact resource they are trying to take advantage of. “

Overexploitation can “degrade the ecosystem and introduce invasive species,” Kolb said. An afternoon spent with a dog in the woods sounds bucolic, but it may not be so enjoyable for the wildlife whose living spaces have been deceived.

This is why trail construction involves complex and interlocking decisions aimed at minimizing the environmental effect of the trail while maximizing the user experience. Once a trail is constructed, maintainers deal with flooding, erosion, and human-created issues, which have a pernicious tendency to wander off a trail and wander through it. the fragile undergrowth of the forest.

Then there are more obviously blatant behaviors: hunting, foraging and graffiti. Trail workers are not law enforcement, said Chris Firme, a volunteer trail worker on the Appalachian Trail. That’s why forgotten outdoor enthusiasts might soon find modern surveillance cameras installed at the start of the trails.

“It’s like an ongoing battle,” Firme said. “Land managers are trying to find a way to mitigate it. “

Lynn Cameron was a 31-year-old research librarian at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Va., When she started hiking the AT 40 years ago. Soon after, she and her husband, Malcolm, began volunteering to tend the trails in the George Washington National Forest and the AT.

They would cut vegetation and clear ditches constructed to divert water from the trail. But her favorite job was cleaning up fallen trees.

One day, his team of four walked three miles through the woods with a chop saw.

“Two of us were sawing and my husband said, ‘Hey guys, there’s a rattlesnake on this log. We all stopped and looked, and there he was in a cavity.

Cameron said the crew got on with the job, but she was delighted by the close-up sighting of the rattle. It was something she would only have known as trail maintenance.

“If we were walking there, we wouldn’t have seen him, let alone spent an hour with him,” she said.

There was a time when a story like this would have made Joseph Dobbins nauseous. The 26-year-old from Dyersburg, TN, Dobbins joined one of the nation’s many youth conservation corps, modeled after the 1930s Civilian Conservation Corps created by President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

At the time, about half a million young men worked in the forests, camps and trails, according to the CCC Legacy website. The program ended at the start of World War II.

The various state and regional conservation bodies that have since started operate on the same model as the CCC and rely on young people in search of a challenge. In California, recruits are promised “hard work, low pay, miserable conditions and more” on the corps’ website home page. Trail workers go deep into the woods, stay in tents for weeks, and sometimes are only supplied with what can be transported.

This kind of life was completely foreign to Dobbins when he started working on the trails in 2019.

“I didn’t know what to expect. I knew I would be out all the time, but I wasn’t mentally prepared to sleep in a tent, have a hand washing station, or poop outside. At first, I said, “This is too much. “

As the leader of the Black Ridge Parkway team, Indigenous people and people of color, Dobbins came to appreciate the life of an outdoor enthusiast. He takes pride in knowing the effect he and his colleagues have on someone else’s nature hike.

“We are definitely designing trails to go around tall trees, rocks, a stream. If you get out of the way, it takes you away from the experience we want you to have, ”he said.

Not all trail builders need a big budget or an army of volunteers. Debra Pearson of College Park, Georgia, entered the world of nature trails quite unexpectedly.

The 70-year-old retired schoolteacher lived in a house with half an acre of natural forest in the backyard, but admits she didn’t think much of trees until her neighbor sawed off those in his court. At the time, Pearson said, the neighbor thought the trees were sick and dying. Pearson sought the advice of an arborist and said the assessment was life changing.

She was told she had a thriving, biodiversity-rich forest on her property, so she built a small trail through her newly discovered treasure.

“I enjoyed the tree canopy, but in 2014 I couldn’t tell one tree from another,” she said. Uninvited, she then checked off the names of trees, bark structures, flowers, and plants that thrived in her garden. “It was such a great ride, a great evolution.”

Over the past decade, Pearson has hosted forest camps and art installations. The neighborhood children built more trails. Now she is like trail workers like everywhere else: she invites others to visit and enjoy.

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Trail East developer abandons downtown effort https://scottishultramarathonseries.org/trail-east-developer-abandons-downtown-effort/ https://scottishultramarathonseries.org/trail-east-developer-abandons-downtown-effort/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 19:43:00 +0000 https://scottishultramarathonseries.org/trail-east-developer-abandons-downtown-effort/

Trail East project developer Uptown Normal has pulled out of the deal.

Bush Construction tells the city now is not the time to move forward. The move comes two months after city council granted Bush’s demands to rework the design of the mixed-use structure to four instead of five stories and to revise the development agreement.

“As they continued to work on the details of their financing, they realized that this was not going to happen not only because of the financing, but also because of the increase in construction and changes in the building. market, ”said city manager Pam Reece.

Reece said she was still optimistic the northeast corner of Uptown Circle is a desirable location for a mixed-use building.

“There is always interest in Uptown in terms of development. Bloomington-Normal and McLean County are currently experiencing strong growth which is an economic engine in our community. There is significant interest in a residential component and part of the trail. The East project included apartments or a residential component. And frankly, the tenants who had indicated they had a pre-rental agreement on the first three floors, I think, are still very interested in having a physical presence in Uptown, ”Uptown said.

Reece said that so far, the city has mainly devoted time to its staff for the five-year effort that began with a request for proposal in 2017. She said the city had not yet buried the utility lines or transferred ownership of two buildings in the city’s project footprint to Bush Construction

“It presents a challenge and an opportunity for city staff to partner with Farnsworth Group and other potential tenants to see who we can bring to the table to make it happen,” said Reece.

She said the city will have to unwind the development agreement. After that, she said she would look for other potential developers to talk about it. The way forward is not yet clear and the city has time to assess the next steps.

“We have to follow our sourcing policy. So I don’t know if that requires another bidding because we put out a proposal in 2017. So we can see if we can bring someone to the table and can -be can we award the signed agreement, if that’s possible, or maybe that’s like issuing a tender, ”Reece said.

A complication for any future developer is a mural on the exterior wall of one of the buildings in the footprint of the proposed new building. It was once the subject of a federal lawsuit filed by some of the artists who created the mural, who fought for its preservation. The lawsuit put the project on hold for about a year, Reece said. The city had agreed to move the wall and mural before the building was demolished and the Trail East site cleared. Then, Bush Construction redesigned its plan to include the existing wall. Reece said she hopes the wall will fit inside any future development.

“It presents challenges in terms of construction, but I think it was a good solution. Relocating the mural, while it can be done, is incredibly expensive and presents construction challenges in itself. So hopefully we can find a way to keep it in place, ”Reece said.

The WGLT also asked Reece if this would be a limiting factor in finding a new developer.

“I’m sure any developer who comes to the table now will want to make sure this doesn’t continue to turn into a lawsuit. The handwriting is on the wall, figuratively and literally, that anyone talking about Trail East is certainly aware of this mural problem. It’s been a very public conversation, “said Reece.

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Beginning of the improvement project on part of the River’s Edge trail https://scottishultramarathonseries.org/beginning-of-the-improvement-project-on-part-of-the-rivers-edge-trail/ https://scottishultramarathonseries.org/beginning-of-the-improvement-project-on-part-of-the-rivers-edge-trail/#respond Tue, 14 Sep 2021 23:59:29 +0000 https://scottishultramarathonseries.org/beginning-of-the-improvement-project-on-part-of-the-rivers-edge-trail/

GREAT FALLS – The River’s Edge Trail is one of the busiest places in Great Falls as people use it daily. Some sections will be closed until October and will undergo renovations and upgrades, including the section that stretches from the Central Avenue West Bridge to the crosswalk next to the skate park on River Drive.

The “River Drive North Trail Improvement Project” will begin September 15, 2021 and end October 28, 2021, weather permitting. The project will replace the existing paved trail with a concrete surface from Central Avenue northbound to the crosswalk near the Skate Park on the River’s Edge Trail.

The portion of the River’s Edge Trail within the work area will be closed during construction. In addition, there may be periodic lane closures on River Drive North.

River’s Edge Trail President Bruce Pollington said this project has been on the books for a while and he’s happy it’s finally done so more people can use a newer and improved trail.

“We are replacing some sections of asphalt that are in pretty bad shape. The asphalt has a life of about 20 years and we’re well past that time, so it’s time to make the replacements, ”Pollington said. “It’s next to the freeway and we want to make some improvements at the same time so it will be a really nice upgrade to this section of the trail.”

River’s Edge has over 53 miles of trails and Pollington said funding for the asphalt project came in part from the Missouri Madison River Fund as well as the city and the River’s Edge Trail Foundation.

He says he cannot say at this point what the final cost of the various projects will be due to the number of entities involved, but estimated that another upcoming project on the River Road Viaduct through the Great Falls Tribune will cost at least $ 2.25 million.

“It’s construction, so it’s going to take longer and cost more than you expected,” Pollington said jokingly. “But they shouldn’t take too long. Our goal with one of these projects is not to obstruct traffic on River Drive and we should be able to achieve that. “

“We are so grateful to the community and their support which has made River’s Edge one of the most used and loved public facilities in Great Falls.”

Click here to visit the River’s Edge Trail website.

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Lewis County Approves Addition of New Trail on County-owned Parcel | Best Stories https://scottishultramarathonseries.org/lewis-county-approves-addition-of-new-trail-on-county-owned-parcel-best-stories/ https://scottishultramarathonseries.org/lewis-county-approves-addition-of-new-trail-on-county-owned-parcel-best-stories/#respond Sat, 11 Sep 2021 00:08:30 +0000 https://scottishultramarathonseries.org/lewis-county-approves-addition-of-new-trail-on-county-owned-parcel-best-stories/

LOWVILLE – The Lewis County Board of Supervisors approved a new 7.5-mile trail addition to the county’s off-road trail system at its Tuesday meeting.

The section of the trail will pass through a county owned piece of land used for forestry, according to Jackie Mahoney, executive director of the Department of Recreation, Forests and Parks, in the Abbey, Beals and Fowlerville Road area in the town of Greig.

“(The cost of the trail) was going to be part of a grant, but due to the restrictions on US steel in the grant (requirements), we are not doing the grant,” Ms. Mahoney said. “We will try to (build the track) internally.”

For most trail projects, the recreation department applies for grants to pay for any new equipment needed while Ms. Mahoney and her team help with trail construction work and other materials as the county match for program funds. grants. Due to Trump-era restrictions on imported steel, however, the subsidy that applies to this type of project will only pay for equipment made from 100% American steel, she said, and no waivers were available to work around the problem.

The decision has been made to try to break the track with the material they have, but it won’t be easy.

“I have some (equipment) but I really need a bigger tractor, so I was going to go for a 70 horsepower tractor with tools,” Ms. Mahoney said.

She hopes her budget request for next year, which includes additional staff as well as necessary equipment, will be approved by lawmakers.

“We are so far behind because of COVID,” Ms. Mahoney said of her team’s trail work. “So it won’t be done until next year. We are too close to the season and we are already in the rainy season.

The new section of the trail connects to the “Commons” area of ​​the trail and, due to the sandy soil in the area, Ms. Mahoney believes that once the trail is created it won’t be too difficult to maintain compared to some trails. . on the Tug Hill plateau.

Once this section of trail is completed, the county will have approximately 95 miles of off-road trails to “improve the recreational use of the natural resources available in the county, as well as to encourage tourism,” as outlined in legislation that has created the system in 2019.

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Wine’n on the Chisholm Trail https://scottishultramarathonseries.org/winen-on-the-chisholm-trail/ https://scottishultramarathonseries.org/winen-on-the-chisholm-trail/#respond Wed, 08 Sep 2021 01:38:00 +0000 https://scottishultramarathonseries.org/winen-on-the-chisholm-trail/

DUNCAN, Oklahoma (KAUZ) – Our pride tour of Duncan’s hometown kicks off Tuesday with the Wine’n on the Chisholm Trail festival.

It is a wine festival that celebrated a long history of cowboys, all of those who trekked the Oklahoma trails to raise cattle from Texas to Kansas in the 1800s.

“The Chisholm Trail is always very vibrant in our community,” said Destiny Ahlfinger, General Manager of Main Street Duncan. “There are still Chisholm Trail markers throughout our community, especially where these cattle drove, so it’s just part of our culture and our heritage and it’s something we still do today.”

Originally run by the Duncan Ambuc Chapter, the Wine’n on the Chisholm Trail is now run by Main Street Duncan and it’s a fun event for those 21 and over.

“On Fridays we have dinner for them to come and enjoy the wines as well as the brewery,” Ahlfanger said. “They will take a little break, shop and come back and enjoy more wine.”

“Usually go with my best friend David, we’re having a blast,” festival attendee Cindy Mann said. “It’s just a great way for the community to connect in a fun atmosphere.”

“There have been a lot of cancellations of things people enjoyed doing, so we’re really excited about the wine festival,” said Kristin Arrington, president of Wine’n on the Chisholm Trail Festival.

And share the story of what happened in this community with others.

“Many years ago there was a celebration of the Chisholm Trail, we each dressed as true historical figures of that time and gave a little presentation on the facts of this person. It was a lot of fun, ”Mann said.

“My favorite part of the Wine’n on the Chisholm Trail festival is just seeing our community come out, sit next to the beautiful myrtle wall mural and taste wine samples of new friendships, this is truly an event with great camaraderie, ”Ahlfanger said.

Wine’n on the Chisholm Trail begins on Friday with an Italian-style dinner and live music.

And on Saturday, attendees can sample samples of Oklahoma wineries and food trucks.

Copyright 2021 KAUZ. All rights reserved.

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Caldor fire updates regarding evacuation orders, warnings and road closures for Tuesday, August 31, 2021 https://scottishultramarathonseries.org/caldor-fire-updates-regarding-evacuation-orders-warnings-and-road-closures-for-tuesday-august-31-2021/ https://scottishultramarathonseries.org/caldor-fire-updates-regarding-evacuation-orders-warnings-and-road-closures-for-tuesday-august-31-2021/#respond Wed, 01 Sep 2021 01:38:44 +0000 https://scottishultramarathonseries.org/caldor-fire-updates-regarding-evacuation-orders-warnings-and-road-closures-for-tuesday-august-31-2021/

Evacuation Warnings – Effective immediately for Douglas County, Nevada (7:30 p.m.)

Douglas County is asking the following communities to be on the alert and start preparing for possible evacuations. Evacuations have not been ordered for the following areas at this time; however, it is possible that evacuation warnings will turn into evacuation orders in the near future. The potentially affected communities are:

Douglas County, NV – Evacuation Warning

The following area is affected: Zone 2 Any house or property located on Foothill Road from Centerville Lane north to Muller. This area includes the valley side of Kingsbury Grade and all the houses accessed by Foothill Road between Centerville Lane and Muller Lane.

These communities are urged to be on the alert and to start preparing for possible evacuations. No evacuations have been ordered yet, but evacuation orders are possible in the near future and road closures are imminent. Please stay alert, pay attention to emergency phone alerts, and have a plan in place.

Security message: Have a transportation plan for animals and livestock. Think about what fuel, medicine, souvenirs, documents, and groceries you might need. Think about loved ones on oxygen or anyone who might need help leaving their home. Living with Fire has a forest fire escape checklist for reference. To view, visit the following link: https://www.livingwithfire.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/Evacuation-Checklist-2020-one-page.pdf

In the event of an evacuation, you will receive an emergency alert notification on your phone and rescuers may ask you to leave your home. It is not recommended to wait for someone to come to your home. If you do not feel safe, leave the area. If you do not have a cell phone or landline, please keep in touch with your friends, neighbors, colleagues and family.

Evacuation shelters:

  • Douglas County Community and Seniors Center – Douglas County residents only 1329 Waterloo Lane, Gardnerville, NV
  • Reno Sparks Convention Center
    4590 South Virginia Street, Reno, NV
  • Lyon County Exhibition Center – Dry camp only
    100 95A East, Yerington, NV
  • Dayton Event Center / Rodeo Grounds – Dry camping only
    500 Schaad Lane, Dayton, NV

Animal shelters:

• the Reno Sparks convention center
4590 South Virginia Street, Reno, NV
* Crates and limited space for pets

  • Lyon County Exhibition Center – Dry camp only
    100 95A East, Yerington, NV
  • Dayton Event Center / Rodeo Grounds – Dry camping only
    500 Schaad Lane, Dayton, NV
  • Caldor Fire in Douglas County
    920 Pinenut Road, Gardnerville, NV

Updated Evacuation Orders, Warnings & Road Closures – Effective Immediately for Alpine County (4:45 PM)

Alpine County Evacuation Orders:

Highway 88 to Forestdale Road. West of Forestdale Road and south to the Pacific Crest Trail junction. West of the Pacific Crest Trail to the Summit City Canyon Trail. West of the Summit City Canyon Trail and south to the El Dorado / Stanislaus National Forest Line. El Dorado / Stanislaus national forest line west to the Alpine and Amador counties line.

North of Hwy 88, along the Alpine / EI Dorado County line and Armstrong Summit to the Nevada state line. West of the state of Nevada south to Luther Creek. Northwest of Luther Creek to Woodfords. North of Hwy 88 and Hwy 89 to Alpine / EI Dorado County line.

Alpine County Evacuation Warnings:

  • North of Hwy 89 from Woodfords due north to Luther Creek at the state limit of Nevada.
  • East of Forestdale Road and south to the Pacific Crest Trail junction.
  • East of the Pacific Crest Trail to the Summit City Canyon Trail.
  • East of Summit City Canyon Trail and south to the El Dorado / Stanislaus National Forest Line.
  • El Dorado / Stanislaus National Forest Line east to the northern edge of Upper Blue Lakes.
  • North of the northwest edge of Upper Blue Lake to the southern aspect of Hawkins Peak and to the Woodfords junction.
  • South of Highway 88 at Woodfords Junction to Forestdale Road

REMARKS: All previous evacuation orders and warnings remain in effect. A mandatory evacuation order is defined as an immediate threat to life. It’s a legal order to leave now. The area is legally closed to public access. An evacuation warning is defined as a potential threat to life and / or property. Those who need more time to evacuate and those with pets and livestock should leave now.

Evacuation Orders – Effective immediately for Douglas County, Nevada (4:00 PM)

The following evacuation orders are issued for the areas below.

The following affected communities in Douglas County, Nevada (excluding Stateline Casinos) are:

  • Upper Kingsbury (South)
  • Upper Kingsbury (North)
  • Kingsbury Center
  • Lower Kingsbury
  • Round Hill area and roads including Lower Elks Point
  • Lake village
  • Lower Olivers, Kahle Drive area and roads

These evacuation orders will include areas from Highway 50 to Lake Parkway, east to Elks Point Road (excluding Stateline Casinos) and National Road 207 (Kingsbury Grade) from Highway 50 to Tramway Drive, including all area roads north and south of Kingsbury Grade.

Nevada Department of Transportation – Road Closures:

The following are soft road closures. which means that the roads are open to residents and employees who must enter the area to access their homes or work.

  • US 50 going west (into the Tahoe Basin) to Spooner Jct. (S. Carson Street 8, 50)
  • SR 207 westbound to Foothill Rd (intersection at bottom of Kingsbury Grade)
  • SR 28 and US 50 Jct. Westbound on 50

These communities are urged to be on the alert and to start preparing for possible evacuations. No evacuation has been ordered yet, but evacuation orders are possible in the near future and road closures are imminent. Please stay alert, pay attention to emergency phone alerts, and have a plan in place.

Security message: Have a transportation plan for animals and livestock. Think about what fuel, medicine, souvenirs, documents, and groceries you might need. Think about loved ones on oxygen or anyone who might need help leaving their home. Living with Fire has a forest fire escape checklist for reference. To view, visit the following link: https://www.livingwithfire.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/10/Evacuation-Checklist-2020-one-page.pdf

In the event of an evacuation, you will receive an emergency alert notification on your phone and rescuers may ask you to leave your home. It is not recommended to wait for someone to come to your home. If you do not feel safe, leave the area. If you do not have a cell phone or landline, please keep in touch with your friends, neighbors, colleagues and family.

Evacuation shelters:

  • Douglas County Community and Seniors Center – Douglas County residents only 1329 Waterloo Lane, Gardnerville, NV
  • Reno Sparks Convention Center
    4590 South Virginia Street, Reno, NV
  • Lyon County Exhibition Center – Dry camp only
    100 95A East, Yerington, NV
  • Dayton Event Center / Rodeo Grounds – Dry camping only
    500 Schaad Lane, Dayton, NV

Animal shelters:

• the Reno Sparks convention center
4590 South Virginia Street, Reno, NV
* Crates and limited space for pets

  • Lyon County Exhibition Center – Dry camp only
    100 95A East, Yerington, NV
  • Dayton Event Center / Rodeo Grounds – Dry camping only
    500 Schaad Lane, Dayton, NV
  • Caldor Fire in Douglas County
    920 Pinenut Road, Gardnerville, NV

For more information, scan the QR code above or visit https://linktr.ee/imt6

Source: California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection
caldor831 4 p.m. card1
caldor831 4 p.m. map2


Updated Evacuation Orders, Warnings and Road Closures – Effective Immediately for Alpine County

Alpine County Evacuation Orders:

August 31, 2021 – Highway 88 at Forestdale Road. West of Forestdale Road and south to the Pacific Crest Trail junction. West of the Pacific Crest Trail to Fire calSummit City Canyon Trail. West of Summit City Canyon Trail and south to the El Dorado / Stanislaus National Forest Line. El Dorado / Stanislaus national forest line west to the Alpine and Amador counties line.

North of Hwy 88, along the Alpine County / El Dorado line and Armstrong Summit to the Nevada state line. West of the state of Nevada south to Luther Creek. Northwest of Luther Creek to Woodfords. North of Route 88 and Route 89 to the Alpine / El Dorado County line.

Alpine County Evacuation Warnings:

  • North of Hwy 89 from Woodfords due north to Luther Creek at the state limit of Nevada.
  • East of Forestdale Road and south to the Pacific Crest Trail junction.
  • East of the Pacific Crest Trail to the Summit City Canyon Trail.
  • East of Summit City Canyon Trail and south to the El Dorado / Stanislaus National Forest Line.
  • El Dorado / Stanislaus National Forest Line east to the northern edge of Upper Blue Lakes.
  • North of the northwest edge of Upper Blue Lake to the southern aspect of Hawkins Peak and to the Woodfords junction.
  • South of Highway 88 at Woodfords Junction to Forestdale Road

REMARKS: All previous evacuation orders and warnings remain in effect. A mandatory evacuation order is defined as an immediate threat to life. It’s a legal order to leave now. The area is legally closed to public access.

An evacuation warning is defined as a potential threat to life and / or property. Those who need more time to evacuate and those with pets and livestock should leave now.

Security message: The public is reminded to remain vigilant on the current fire conditions. Please continue to obey road closures and all evacuation orders and warnings. A reminder to drive slowly and give way to emergency personnel in the area. There will be smoke in the respective areas as firefighters continue with firefighting operations. If at any time you feel unsafe, please call 911.

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Bill to Congress would complete the Continental Divide Trail https://scottishultramarathonseries.org/bill-to-congress-would-complete-the-continental-divide-trail/ https://scottishultramarathonseries.org/bill-to-congress-would-complete-the-continental-divide-trail/#respond Fri, 27 Aug 2021 22:32:24 +0000 https://scottishultramarathonseries.org/bill-to-congress-would-complete-the-continental-divide-trail/

WASHINGTON (KDVR) – With over 160 miles of its route unfinished, the Continental Divide National Scenic Trail has never been completed, forcing hikers to use roads to connect to the next part of the trail.

The Continental Divide Trail Completion Act – introduced by U.S. Representative Joe Neguse, D-Boulder, to Congress on Friday – would order the U.S. Forest Service to complete the trail before its 50th anniversary in 2028.

“As a proud Continental Divide Trail walkway community, the Town of Grand Lake is pleased to support the Continental Divide Trail Completion Act to conserve and improve access to natural, scenic, historic and cultural resources on the along the Continental Divide, ”Grand Lake said Mayor Steve Kudron.

“Completion of the Continental Divide Trail will benefit the community of Grand Lake and the thousands of visitors who flock to the city for its natural environment and recreational resources,” said Kudron.

The trail follows the Continental Divide for over 3,100 miles and stretches from Canada to Mexico. The northern part of the trail ends at the Canadian border in Glacier National Park.

The trail passes through New Mexico, Colorado, Wyoming, Idaho, and Montana.

“People from all over the world visit our community to enjoy the Continental Divide Trail as it touches the sky at Grays Peak – the highest point of any National Scenic Trail,” said Summit County Commissioner Tamara Pogue. .

“The Continental Divide Trail Completion Act will support our economy and ensure this trail remains a national treasure for generations to come,” said Pogue.

As a National Scenic Trail, the Continental Divide Trail provides a protected beauty area for the public to connect with nature.

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Westfield to Launch Crosswalk System at 161st Street, Monon Trail – WISH-TV | Indianapolis News | Indiana weather https://scottishultramarathonseries.org/westfield-to-launch-crosswalk-system-at-161st-street-monon-trail-wish-tv-indianapolis-news-indiana-weather/ https://scottishultramarathonseries.org/westfield-to-launch-crosswalk-system-at-161st-street-monon-trail-wish-tv-indianapolis-news-indiana-weather/#respond Wed, 25 Aug 2021 00:14:00 +0000 https://scottishultramarathonseries.org/westfield-to-launch-crosswalk-system-at-161st-street-monon-trail-wish-tv-indianapolis-news-indiana-weather/

WESTFIELD (WISH) – A high-intensity activated crosswalk known as the HAWK system installed at 161st Street on the Monon Trail is expected to start operating on Wednesday.

Angel Ray uses this part of the Monon Trail every week. “It’s very busy. There is a lot of traffic and there is so much going on with the cars. The traffic flow is just intense.

Drivers are not supposed to stop, and signs say so, but News 8 on Tuesday saw a few vehicles passing by and signaling pedestrians and cyclists to cross. The municipal government spent approximately $ 100,000 to install a high-intensity push-button crosswalk system at the intersection of the trail.

Ray said, “It’s doable and it’s something we’ve all needed for a while, a while now.”

Chris McConnell, Westfield Parks and Recreation Superintendent, told News 8: “Well, the council told us we had to put it in place, and that’s also to try to make this exchange a bit safer. It is probably our busiest interchange. We are only a few blocks from US 31 on an exit ramp.

A similar pedestrian crossing system is already in operation along Hazel Dell Road.

According to McConnell, pedestrians or cyclists on the Monon Trail press a button. The crosswalk sign will turn to “walk” giving them approximately 20 seconds to cross. For drivers, the activated system will change from a flashing yellow light, to a fixed yellow, to a double fixed red. Flashing red lights indicate the countdown to where drivers should stop first. But if a driver, pedestrian or cyclist is at the intersection, that person can continue.

“Solid red means someone is in the crosswalk and you need to stop. Flashing red is the countdown and you have to stop at flashing red first, but if there is no one at the intersection you can go ahead and continue as the driver, ”McConnell said Tuesday.

Westfield resident Stephanie Davis said: “The flashing red lights can be a bit confusing for people, but I think once you get used to it I know Hazel Dell’s works great. So I think it’s gonna be awesome here.

Westfield resident Bonnie Miller said: “I see on Nextdoor (app) that a lot of people are against anyone stopping. They think drivers should be trained and walkers should be trained and hope for the best, but I like the idea of ​​safety first.

City administrators said the safest thing would be to completely separate vehicle and pedestrian traffic by placing the trail under the road. They have plans for a grade jump, but that timeline is on hold.

McConnell said: “Back when (US) 31 was under construction and the road was closed, we took the first step by putting the tunnel cover and the piles or steel beams that would end up being the walls. under the road. So there is no tunnel here per se, but the top of the tunnel and the stilts are here and currently we are in the process of designing to move forward with the idea of ​​putting a tunnel under 161st Street. .

City administrators said that ultimately city council would decide whether to go ahead with a tunnel project.

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